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Author Topic: Pluto/Charon Pictures  (Read 7464 times)

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Offline Betty

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Re: Pluto/Charon Pictures
« Reply #80 on: May 18, 2016, 03:53:44 PM »
I made this cool enhanced space slideshow in HD. Enjoy!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XAzUdzmTN-4


Offline Betty

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Astronomy tonight. May 2016
« Reply #81 on: May 23, 2016, 09:03:48 PM »
A whole night's view of the planets & stars compressed into 3 1/2 minutes. This is the view from the northern hemisphere, facing south. Early in the night Jupiter sets in the southwest as Saturn, Mars, & the moon - - close together in this view, rise in the southeast. A very large almost full moon sets in the east after sunrise. Click on the full screen view & watch it in beautiful HD!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QFJC6nu6PHg


Offline Betty

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Vacation time stargsazing
« Reply #82 on: July 01, 2016, 12:24:49 PM »
Happy Canada Day & Independence Day! Many of us will be looking up at fireworks over the next few days. Don't forget to notice the stars too. This is also vacation season. Camping or hiking trips, & sitting around a campfire is ideal for stargazing. Once you get out of town, far from city lights, the background sky is blacker, & your eyes adjust to the dimmer light after a while. So you'll see many times more stars & they'll appear more colorful.

Bring some simple 7x50 binoculars. Not only will it enhance your views of distant scenery & nature on your trips, but will also brighten up the stars so you can see more of them with better color. 7x50 is ideal for handheld binoculars because you can comfortably hold them steady. You loose a lot on higher magnifications without a tripod for them because it gets too jittery. "7" is the magnification. Great for scenery, but really won't make sky objects stunningly bigger. "50" is the diameter in millimeters of the front lenses. The bigger they are, the brighter they make faint objects & bring out more color.

I have some big, heavy 20x80 binoculars I rebuilt after the fire. But they're impossible to use without a tripod. Because they're heavy, you need a solid tripod too, not a lightweight camera tripod. If you got an old camcorder tripod in the attic, you can mount most big binoculars on it nicely. Even at 20x you won't get stunning big views of the moon or planets. But stellar views will be amazing. Far away from city lights you will see some galaxies & star clusters with them. On a good night I've seen a galaxy & a few star clusters right downtown in the middle of the city where the sky background would normally be too bright to see them.

My first experience with binocular astronomy was with 10x50 binoculars about 45 years ago, that I got for around $45. But even at 10x, it was hard to hold them steady without propping up myself or arms against something to steady my hand & body motion to see things clear enough.

For stunning views of the moon & even a fair look at the planets you'll need a telescope on a tripod that will give you at least 60x magnification. For viewing stars, galaxies, clusters, & nebula you don't need high magnification, you need a bigger front lens to gather more light & brighten the images. On reflector telescopes, you need one with a bigger primary mirror, not high magnification.

Your best telescope or binoculars will be the one you use the most. That big heavy scope is useless if it's too inconvenient to get out, set up, or carry around a lot, so hardly gets out of the closet. 7x50 or 10x50 binoculars you can easily take anywhere. You can easily scan the skies with them for the fun & beauty of it with no astronomy knowledge.

This is the view of the night sky for the first weekend of July from approximately 10pm to 4AM, but will look similar for about a week. It's split into 4 parts. First, the northern sky view, then the southern sky view, which offers the best summer viewing. Part 3 is the eastern sky view, & then finally the western sky view. Each part shows the entire night of the sky in a little over 2 minutes. These are EXPANDED views. That means stuff near the top of the screen will be almost overhead in real life. These views are for people living anywhere in the northern part of the northern hemisphere of the planet. The stars will be in the same spots at the same time next year too, but the planets & moon won't be.

Enjoy!

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vgg449MavdU" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vgg449MavdU</a>

Offline Betty

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Re: Pluto/Charon Pictures
« Reply #83 on: July 11, 2016, 02:32:52 AM »
I just made & posted an animated view of the night sky for the weekend of July 16-17, 2016. It will look close to the same several nights before & after too. Next year on the same date, it will also look the same except the position of the planets & moon will be different.

This is a view of the motion of the sky observed from anywhere in the northern hemisphere of the planet, from about 9:30pm to 5am, compressed into about 2 1/2 minutes.

But it's 4 different 2 1/2 minute views mixed together making the video over 10 minutes long. The first view is the view facing south. Facing south gives you the view of the most stars & planets, that is when we're facing galactic plane is, & solar plane. In the summer, we're also facing the center of the galaxy at night. In winter, we're facing away from the center when looking south.

The second part of the video is the view looking north, to see the most commonly known constellation, the Big Dipper. Composed of bright stars, it & Orion (in winter) are the only constellations bright enough to be seen entirely in brightly lit cities at night. The edge of it's bowl points to Polaris, the North star. Facing the north star means you're facing true north, not the magnetic north your compass points to.

The third part of the video is the view facing west. The last part of the video is the sky view facing east.

Enjoy astro fans!

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zdThmIUoTrM" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zdThmIUoTrM</a>

This is in true HD, but low a bitrate so should play on slower connections. Be sure to click on HD/720 on you're options at the lower right of the video frame. If may default to 360p, but it's only kinda fun to watch at 480p or better.

Offline Betty

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Re: Pluto/Charon Pictures
« Reply #84 on: July 20, 2016, 12:47:37 PM »
Happy Moon Day!

On July 20, 1969 people first set foot on the moon.

It's also my Mom's birthday, she would have been 87 by now, but we lost her 15 years ago.

Offline alison

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Re: Pluto/Charon Pictures
« Reply #85 on: July 22, 2016, 10:50:08 PM »
I recall seeing a number of papers replacing "Monday July 21, 1969" with "Moonday July 21, 1969"

Offline Betty

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Re: Pluto/Charon Pictures
« Reply #86 on: February 23, 2017, 02:54:07 AM »
The largest glacial collapses ever recorded live. Awesome! Glaciers well over the size of Manhattan, & ice blocks over 600 feet tall rising out of the ocean. This is in 2 parts -- enhanced, & super enhanced with color boost in slow motion.

Since the year 2000, we've lost more global ice than in the past 100 years!

http://unclegadget.com/pski/index.php/topic,83
(edited, enhanced, & remixed by me)

Offline Betty

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Aug 21, 2017 Solar Eclipse
« Reply #87 on: May 28, 2017, 04:34:41 AM »
N.America & Canada will get a rare solar eclipse on Aug. 21. But totality will be just a narrow band stretching from Oregon, to S. Carolina. Still, here in NY state & Southern Ontario we can expect about 72-73% coverage of the sun during the eclipse. Most of the rest of Canada will see at least 50-60% coverage. That's very rare for us northerners. People in SW Canada may see 80% to almost 90% coverage!

The 2:33pm time for the max (75%) solar coverage of the Aug. 21 solar eclipse is wrong for western NY state & southern Ontario though. That's the time of totality along the same longitude down south, in the middle of our time zone.

Because of the tilt of the earth, the tilt of the moon's orbit, and because the earth is not a perfect sphere (it's a slightly flattened ball), plus our altitude, & the large area of our time zone, the max coverage of the sun in our area (72-73% coverage) during the eclipse will happen at 2:17pm.

I checked it with 3 different sets of software, & they all say 2:17pm for Western NY state & SW Ontario. In our area, the eclipse will begin around 1pm, & end around 3:30pm.

Total eclipses, where the sun is totally covered, are extremely rare in our area. There will be solar eclipse of about 90% coverage in our area June 10th, 2021, & a rare total solar eclipse (where is gets dark as night) in the region on April 8th, 2024.

The last time we had a solar eclipse of near 75% was way back on 1984, & almost 60% in 1986. We had an almost, but not quite total solar eclipse in WNY with 90% coverage in 1932. The last total eclipse in the region was in 1925. So it can take a lifetime or more to see just 1 total eclipse in around here.

After 2024, we'll have 60% coverage in 2040, 90% solar coverage in 2048, 75% coverage in 2078, & another total eclipse in 2093 -- 76 years from now.

We get at least 1 partial lunar eclipse (where the moon dims) a year. But our next total lunar eclipse will be Jan. 20th, 2019.

Offline Betty

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Oldest Living things are 5,000-80,000 years old
« Reply #88 on: June 15, 2017, 04:47:35 PM »

Offline Betty

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Re: Pluto/Charon Pictures
« Reply #89 on: June 29, 2017, 08:01:51 AM »
Latest Juno spacecraft pictures of Jupiter. You can see bigger images at the NASA site, but you won't find sharper clearer ones than these that I enhanced myself. Because they are sharper, they're also zoom-able without losing too much sharpness. Just zoom the image or our whole page to make it a little bigger.

http://unclegadget.com/pski/index.php/topic,86.0.html


 

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